Friday, 1 March 2013

HELLO The Classics Club - Lord of the Flies

This was a set book I remember reading at high school. I should say I remember the story, because we watched the film too. What I do know is that I enjoyed that fact that it was kids on an island fending for themselves. The two things that were ingrained in my mind were Piggy and the conch.

William Golding - novelist, playwright and poet - was born 19th September 1911, in Cornwall, England. Best know for his novel, Lord of the Flies, published by Faber and Faber, 1954. Initially not successful, it became a best-seller in the sixties, and a popular choice for set reading in schools and colleges.
WILLIAM GOLDING
19/09/19 - 10/06/93
This classic involves a group of school boys who crash land on an uninhabited island. It's a story about survival without adults, a child's greatest fear. Initially, 'no adults' seems fun, but someone has to take control. Ralph takes this role with the conch shell, bringing order out of chaos. But things go belly-up.

This book is a psychological and sociological experience about isolation. Educated boys form groups to perform tasks such as hunting and fire lighting, and rules are created. Paradise becomes a threat when fear emerges in the form of the 'beast.' Basic life breaks down into primitive savagery. 

My remembered character, Piggy, is a wonderfully flawed character in many ways, but one that keeps the characters and story in check, I think. The sensible 'adult' figure amongst the groups trying to get his voice heard.

It may not have had a fairy-tale ending, but stranded on an island, things were never going to end smoothly. I found it satisfying.



2 comments:

  1. Somehow ended up on your blog by accident, but glad I did. I just read Lord of the Flies for The Classic Club as well. I had not read it in school like just about everybody else. Really enjoyed it.
    http://severalfourmany.wordpress.com/2013/02/20/lord-of-the-flies/

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's been much too long since I've read this. I recall that it tore my heart out. But that was a good thing!

    ReplyDelete