Monday, 16 April 2012

HELLO First Draft

Last Monday I finished the first draft of my current WIP - The Wind Knows My Name.



FINISHED

From last years experience doing NaNo, I learned the hard way - after handwriting a few thousand words - how laborious it was to type it up. I mostly typed straight on to my netbook, but also had this lovely blue floral notebook: to try out ideas, make sketches, as well as writing a scene or two.

Previously, I'd never got past writing the first three chapters because of constantly editing. But this time I just got the story out (another NaNo lesson).

I used Scrivener - which I raved  about last year - a writing tool most useful. After compiling the draft, I exported it to Word and pressed print. In my excitement, I forgot to run the spelling/grammar checker. Oops. I'm now doing this along side the hard copy. 



RED LETTER DAY

Now the big task: edit, rewrite, rewrite, rewrite. How many times was that? Heck, I hope I don't grow to hate this book. I doubt it.


ONE STEP AT A TIME

Throughout this writing process I have kept references to help me with the various stepping stones that will get me to the final draft. The following comes from an article: A One-Stop Shopwritten by Stewart Ferris, and can be found in the December 2011 issue of Writing Magazine. He suggests a ten stage redraft:

Draft 1 Typing a rough copy of the finished book
Draft 2 Tightening the structure and filling gaps
Draft 3 Character development
Draft 4 Working on dialogue
Draft 5 Working on language and imagery
Draft 6 Restructuring parts of the book
Draft 7 Adding layers of conflict
Draft 8 Improve opening pages
Draft 9 More on character development
Draft 10 Proof reading for mistakes

I've also read recently that changing the font, and coming back to reread the work will highlight some errors. And in Nicola Morgan's book - Write To Be Published - I've learnt about cutting superfluous words, and purple prose, the power of the active voice, and the need to get the reader to the action.



MORE HURDLES?
NO ONE SAID
IT WAS GOING TO BE EASY

So, what's the purpose of all this rewriting? At the end of the day - your baby - your book, that you've sweated months/years/decades on, has to be the best that it can be.


WOW!

I'll keep you up to date on my progress. Who knows what the final draft will read like?

How do you write your first draft? Are you editing along the way? Do you have a favourite part of the process? Have you used anything similar to the ten stage draft?

Wednesday, 11 April 2012

HELLO A Classics Challenge

April's prompt for A Classics Challenge is THE BOOK COVER. 

I am currently reading...

1992 EDITION
Twenty years ago I bought this book, and for some reason couldn't get into it; I never got past the first two chapters. Some years later I tried again, and the same happened. I don't know why. But, I kept the book all these years because I knew I would eventually read it through. Currently I'm on chapter seven.

The book cover does capture the essence of the book. You have the house - Manderley - the narrator/MC - Mrs de Winter. She is pictured here: young, forlorn, vulnerable, and partially obscuring the house, which adds to the mystery. What is being hidden? There is suspense here. From what I have read so far, this place - Manderley - has a personality of its own.

Compare this with the first edition.

1938 FIRST EDITION 

I quite like this bright cover even though it doesn't tell you much about the story. That's what images do. You kind of expect faces on the cover, especially if the title of the book is the name of someone. Later editions incorporate: Mrs de Winter (we never find out her first name), Rebecca, Mrs Danvers, Maxim de Winter, and Manderley.


1969 EDITION

1962 EDITION

1971 EDITION
1962 EDITION

2003 EDITION
Which cover do you prefer?

What would I have chosen? A combination of the 1962 Penguin cover and the 2003 edition.

SOMETHING LIKE THIS

EDIT: Yay, I finished reading Rebecca 14/4/12. Why did I wait so long? It was a superb read.